Jeremy…husband of Catherine, father of Ben, Simeon, Tom, Joshua & Lydia. Up until the end of April 2015, he was pastor/vicar of a group of churches on the edge of Exeter in Devon, UK. In early October 2014, aged 48, he was diagnosed with advanced cancer, a stage four malignant melanoma presenting as a tumour on his lungs. The usual life expectancy is 8-12 months. Then, in late December 2014, 23 year old Ben suffered a seizure. After prolonged medical care for what was most likely to have been a viral infection affecting his brain, Ben died in April 2015. Jeremy has up until recently seemed to have responded well to pioneering immunotherapy treatments that can extend life, but from September 2016 is now facing the fresh development of brain tumours and potentially now just months to live. On January 27th 2017 Jeremy took his last breath and went to be his Lord and Saviour. The family share their thoughts, feelings and reflections as they taJeremy…husband of Catherine, father of Ben, Simeon, Tom, Joshua & Lydia. Up until the end of April 2015, he was pastor/vicar of a group of churches on the edge of Exeter in Devon, UK. In early October 2014, aged 48, he was diagnosed with advanced cancer, a stage four malignant melanoma presenting as a tumour on his lungs. The usual life expectancy is 8-12 months. Then, in late December 2014, 23 year old Ben suffered a seizure. After prolonged medical care for what was most likely to have been a viral infection affecting his brain, Ben died in April 2015. Jeremy has up until recently seemed to have responded well to pioneering immunotherapy treatments that can extend life, but from September 2016 is now facing the fresh development of brain tumours and potentially now just months to live. On January 27th 2017 Jeremy took his last breath and went to be with his Lord and Saviour. The family share their thoughts, feelings and reflections as they take this painful and unexpected journey.

Tom’s tribute to Jeremy

My tribute to Jeremy Clark:

“Ziad Abdelnour said a truly rich man is one whose children would run into his arms even when his hands are empty. Jeremy Clark was a wealthy man indeed. A loving father, he was able to be both gentle and tough, firm yet loving, and has been a great supporter in my various endeavours. A man I have greatly admired, he has been a valued role model, showing me what it is to be a patient, humble and kind man, slow to anger, and quick to apologise when wrong.

Many examples of this come to mind. In particular, I remember when a homeless man came into his church, hungry and asking for food. Never a man to turn people away, he took him around the corner to the local chippie and bought him a hot a meal. This simple act of kindness has long stuck with me, and I think it’s indicative of the sort of man he was. There are many other such stories, and I’m sure many here today will have their own tales of his servant heart, and his real care for people too.

Of course, he had his playful side as well. I recall all the play-fighting with him throughout my childhood, in which my brothers and I would swarm the poor man, climbing all over him and holding his legs together to trip him up. He was hopelessly outnumbered and didn’t stand a chance, but that serves him right for having four sons. I will also fondly remember the adventures of rhubarb the banana, the central character in many stories he made up for us as children.

During my teens, I also came to appreciate his intellect and quiet wisdom. Never a man to impose his advice, but glad to give it when asked, his suggestions were always thoughtful and carefully considered. I would enjoy quiet countryside walks with him, in which he provided thoughtful conversation or just quiet companionship. Indeed, his quiet demeanour was something I loved very much about him. We would also listen to music together, and he’d explain the history and meaning of each piece. In his final weeks, I would play that music for him, and in turn tell him about each piece, just as he had told me.

They say that the greatest thing a man can do for his children is to love their mother. This he did too; he has been a faithful and loving husband to my mother for 27 years. Likewise, she has been a most devoted wife, especially in looking after him throughout his cancer and deterioration, which I know was not easy. A testament to their strong partnership.

Lastly, my father was a man who loved Christ, and his faith has greatly impacted the sort of man he was. With a real heart for the gospel, his ministry has always been down to earth, and has touched many lives, making a real difference for people in many places, whether they were a part of his congregation or not. He spoke to me several times about how he looked forward to entering Heaven. I expect he shall be welcomed with those words from the book of Matthew: ‘Well done, good and faithful servant.’

I shall miss this man of gentle fortitude. I am sad that he will not be there for my graduation, my wedding should I marry, nor to meet any of his grandchildren, and I shall miss his guidance, but I am grateful for the time I have had with him. My last words to him in our final conversation were to repeat something I had told him several years prior: ‘I may be taller than you, dad, but I will always look up to you.’

I am honoured to be called his son.”

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Comments on: "Tom’s tribute to Jeremy" (5)

  1. Rev Simeon Damdar said:

    Thanks Josh,
    Even though it is a long time since, your Dad was with us In the London City Mission, there are those who recently learnt of his homecall, remembered him fondly. Indeed, he was one of those young men who was highly respected and trusted, not only by the young people, but also by the people in the area. He had a great aptitude for learning, including playing the piano for us, when I would say to him….You can do it Jeremy.

    Your special words to him, that even though you are taller than him, you would always look up to him……….

    And I know why….He kept looking up to His Great Lord, Master and Teacher. He is there right now, in His Presence……Halleluyah.

    Josh, The Lord bless you and keep you.

    Rev Simeon DAMDAR.

    Like

  2. Rev Simeon Damdar said:

    OOPS, Josh, the recent post is meant for Tom…….Father God bless.

    Like

  3. Tim and Tracey said:

    ‘I may be taller than you, dad, but I will always look up to you”
    Wonderful words, they brought a big smile to my face.
    Thank you for your words. Tracey, I and Rosie and Hannah are honoured to have known your Dad as a friend. God bless

    Like

  4. Catherine.
    I’m sorry for your loss. I am sure Jeremy is in a much better place and in peace.
    I was hoping to make it down to Exeter for the thanks giving but unfortunately couldn’t.

    Please email me your address. I’d like to send a card please.

    Ayman
    Aikidoexeter@icloud.com

    Like

  5. Diane & Paul Fraser said:

    well said Tom – bless you

    Like

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