Jeremy…husband of Catherine, father of Ben, Simeon, Tom, Joshua & Lydia. Up until the end of April 2015, he was pastor/vicar of a group of churches on the edge of Exeter in Devon, UK. In early October 2014, aged 48, he was diagnosed with advanced cancer, a stage four malignant melanoma presenting as a tumour on his lungs. The usual life expectancy is 8-12 months. Then, in late December 2014, 23 year old Ben suffered a seizure. After prolonged medical care for what was most likely to have been a viral infection affecting his brain, Ben died in April 2015. Jeremy has up until recently seemed to have responded well to pioneering immunotherapy treatments that can extend life, but from September 2016 is now facing the fresh development of brain tumours and potentially now just months to live. On January 27th 2017 Jeremy took his last breath and went to be his Lord and Saviour. The family share their thoughts, feelings and reflections as they taJeremy…husband of Catherine, father of Ben, Simeon, Tom, Joshua & Lydia. Up until the end of April 2015, he was pastor/vicar of a group of churches on the edge of Exeter in Devon, UK. In early October 2014, aged 48, he was diagnosed with advanced cancer, a stage four malignant melanoma presenting as a tumour on his lungs. The usual life expectancy is 8-12 months. Then, in late December 2014, 23 year old Ben suffered a seizure. After prolonged medical care for what was most likely to have been a viral infection affecting his brain, Ben died in April 2015. Jeremy has up until recently seemed to have responded well to pioneering immunotherapy treatments that can extend life, but from September 2016 is now facing the fresh development of brain tumours and potentially now just months to live. On January 27th 2017 Jeremy took his last breath and went to be with his Lord and Saviour. The family share their thoughts, feelings and reflections as they take this painful and unexpected journey.

The Last Post

It is January 26th 2017. I am sitting in the family room at the hospice. It is completely silent; the peace is incredible. Jeremy is breathing so,so quietly. His breathing is fast and there are indications of colour change. He still feels quite warm but this could be due to infection which is masking the coolness of death. We are ready to let him go. We have slept on his floor for the past 3 nights and that has been fun but we need to get used to our new normal. He has fought well and we can’t wait til he reaches heaven. I had such a sense of the anticipation for his arrival on Tuesday afternoon.

We know he is in his last hours and we sit and wait by his side. We have told him constantly that we love him, that he is free to go and that I will be with him to the end. We all were able to say significant goodbyes on Saturday and on Sunday evening a wondeful friend brought communion to us at the Hospice. We realised today that it was his last meal. He went to sleep shortly afterwards and has never really woken up. Each day this week we have been told departure is imminent but at 4.30pm on Thursday we are still at the same point.

But at 4.01am on Friday January 27th 2017 I heard him take his last breath and blessed him on his way to the most amazing place, with the Lord Jesus Christ where he will be constantly worshipping the Father. We couldn’t wish him to be anywhere else. Jeremy you have been the most amazing husband, father and friend. We love you so much and know you have heard the words “good and faithful servant.”

We are having a service of Thanksgiving at 3pm at Belmont Chapel in Exeter on Saturday February 11th. We do so hope you can join us to celebrate this wonderful man’s life.

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Comments on: "The Last Post" (53)

  1. David Williams, Upton said:

    “After this it was noised abroad that Mr. VALIANT-FOR-TRUTH was taken with a summons by the same post as the other; and had this for a token that the summons was true, that his pitcher was broken at the fountain.

    When he understood it, he called for his friends, and told them of it. Then said he,
    “I am going to my Father’s; and though with great difficulty I am got hither, yet now I do not repent me of all the trouble I have been at to arrive where I am. My sword I give to him that shall succeed me in my pilgrimage; and my courage and skill to him that can get it. My marks and scars I carry with me, to be a witness for me that I have fought his battles who now will be my Rewarder.”

    When the day that he must go hence was come, many accompanied him to the riverside; into which as he went he said, “Death, where is thy sting?” And as he went down deeper, he said, “Grave, where is thy victory?” So he passed over; and all the trumpets sounded for him on the other side.”

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  2. It is still hard to process that Jeremy has gone. I have been thinking of the rest of you, Catherine, all week and praying that you will know God’s arms of comfort around you. So many of us have been deeply blessed by Jeremy, and feel his loss greatly, but you will bear the greatest pain of parting.

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  3. Chris Goswami said:

    Really trust and pray that as you settle into a new life you will know peace and joy … and thank you for writing so bravely and so well 🙂

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