Jeremy…husband of Catherine, father of Ben, Simeon, Tom, Joshua & Lydia. Up until the end of April 2015, he was pastor/vicar of a group of churches on the edge of Exeter in Devon, UK. In early October 2014, aged 48, he was diagnosed with advanced cancer, a stage four malignant melanoma presenting as a tumour on his lungs. The usual life expectancy is 8-12 months. Then, in late December 2014, 23 year old Ben suffered a seizure. After prolonged medical care for what was most likely to have been a viral infection affecting his brain, Ben died in April 2015. Jeremy has up until recently seemed to have responded well to pioneering immunotherapy treatments that can extend life, but from September 2016 is now facing the fresh development of brain tumours and potentially now just months to live. On January 27th 2017 Jeremy took his last breath and went to be his Lord and Saviour. The family share their thoughts, feelings and reflections as they taJeremy…husband of Catherine, father of Ben, Simeon, Tom, Joshua & Lydia. Up until the end of April 2015, he was pastor/vicar of a group of churches on the edge of Exeter in Devon, UK. In early October 2014, aged 48, he was diagnosed with advanced cancer, a stage four malignant melanoma presenting as a tumour on his lungs. The usual life expectancy is 8-12 months. Then, in late December 2014, 23 year old Ben suffered a seizure. After prolonged medical care for what was most likely to have been a viral infection affecting his brain, Ben died in April 2015. Jeremy has up until recently seemed to have responded well to pioneering immunotherapy treatments that can extend life, but from September 2016 is now facing the fresh development of brain tumours and potentially now just months to live. On January 27th 2017 Jeremy took his last breath and went to be with his Lord and Saviour. The family share their thoughts, feelings and reflections as they take this painful and unexpected journey.

Pembrolizumab begins

Writing from my treatment chair in oncology two days ago… 

Version 2There’s a strange feeling of déjà vu and a bittersweet familiarity with what is happening today. Sixteen months on from when I was last here, once again I’m connected to a drip receiving a fresh round of immunotherapy, this time the very new pembrolizumab which last December was made famous for its remarkable effect on former US President Jimmy Carter, also diagnosed with advanced melanoma (click here to read a brief article about his situation).

Once again, I’m plugged into this surreal world of the oncology treatment ward where seeming normality coalesces with the utter foreign-ness of it, where calm is sometimes a thin veneer for an anxiety that’s gripped an individual and then swept through family and friends collectively and where cheerfulness rubs alongside all the ‘ifs’ and ‘buts’ that the mind trips around in an attempt to cope with ‘today’.

This armchair I’m sitting in, the chairs we all sit in around the amazing Cherrybrook ward, contain unique people each with a story of life interrupted, overtaken by a diagnosis they perhaps always thought was going to be someone else’s news, not theirs. I walk through the ward and its various bays to my own bay and chair, past some who’re plainly unwell, and still others who look as any other person you might see in the street. But here we all are. All on the level. All touched by cancer. It’s wonderful having a great team of nurses who laugh, joke and talk as if we’re all sitting on a bus going on holiday together. It’s also been good today to share the journey with a younger woman sitting near me who has a similar story to mine, also living with melanoma, and like me, had her first brush with it twelve years before (I’m told this is a very common period – 12 years on, and then melanoma comes out of hiding) and now on the same drug therapy as me. Having had four doses already, she’s a real encouragement saying how easy the pembrolizumab treatment has been both in terms of side effects and the flexibility of time between doses.  But unlike last year’s four 2hr sessions for ipilumumab, this drug only needs a short 30-45 minute infusion each session. It’s hardly time to put my feet up and relax.

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The two of us twelve months ago

Ricocheting around my mind though is the news Ayman gave me on Thursday that he’s leaving the hospital to take up another appointment in immunotherapy research. In so many ways, it’s not a surprise as his interest in it and the science behind it is clear. He’s plainly got a lot to offer in the ongoing development of this breakthrough therapy for the various types of cancer which, until recently, had no significant treatment. But I’ll miss him because as my regular doctor in the Exeter Oncology Department, he’s been a real rock, seemingly always nearby or on the end of the phone to answer questions, to clarify things, to reassure…and to make it all feel quite everyday. My visits to both the clinic and ward won’t now be the same without him in the times to come. 

48hrs on….Sunday afternoon

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Catherine at Overbeck’s, Salcombe

Yesterday, Catherine and I meandered down to Devon’s south coast, to beautiful Salcombe and the gardens of the National Trust’s Overbeck’s. Apart from feeling pretty unwell while there and wondering if this was the result of either dabrafenib’s withdrawal or pembrolizumab’s entry, we had a good time out enjoying rural Devon, always incomparable on a good spring day.

But our reactions to my seedy state both in Salcombe and during the night, combined with periods of fatigue, indicate that our internal radars are on heightened alert as the new drug settles in and either helps produce an effect or has none. This state of alert can in itself be tiring. But it’s complicated by some tough things we’re facing with our young ones and decisions they face. The ongoing effects of grief for them and the anticipation of either what is or isn’t round the corner, is hard.

At the same time, I found particular fresh encouragement in words of Jesus in the Bible that stirred me the other day…

“On the last and greatest day of the festival, Jesus stood and said in a loud voice, ‘Let anyone who is thirsty come to me and drink. Whoever believes in me, as Scripture has said, rivers of living water will flow from within them’. By this he meant the Spirit, whom those who believed in him were later to receive” (John 7)

Fresh springsIt’s an invitation to come and know the unparalleled, the matchless presence, strength and comfort of God found uniquely in Christ Jesus. If He’s saying nothing else here, He’s saying that He alone is the source and author of life, the one who, when I come to Him, stick close with Him, gives true satisfaction and meaning to life. Drinking from anywhere else won’t satisfy or save. This One is the incomparable best and we can walk in His wake, safe and secure. I found myself doing just that as I lay awake in the night, unable to sleep for some discomfort, tuning in with Him again.

As I sat outside on Saturday in the early morning sun, coffee in hand, the invitation I’d read from John’s gospel a few days earlier was quietly reiterated in a different way as I read from the Psalms words of King David, written 3000 years ago…

Hear my cry, O God;

    listen to my prayer.

From the ends of the earth I call to you,

    I call as my heart grows faint;

    lead me to the rock that is higher than I.

For you have been my refuge,

    a strong tower against the foe.

I long to dwell in your tent for ever

    and take refuge in the shelter of your wings.  (Psalm 61)

They’re words I remember impacting me as a 20 year old. They impacted me afresh this weekend and I made them my own. They’re words we can all use.

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Comments on: "Pembrolizumab begins" (9)

  1. Paul & Sue Knab said:

    Our thoughts and prayers go out for you, Jeremy and the family. Yo really are amazing and such a rock yourself. Love Paul & Sue

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Pat Cusa said:

    You are all, always in my thoughts and do hope with fingers crossed and lots of prayers for your ongoing treatment and for the result. Very best wishes Pat Cusa Clyst St Mary

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Matt Lowe said:

    Hi Jeremy, thinking and praying for you. Hang in there

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Jackie Vaney said:

    Hi Jeremy, praying for healing and that God will carry you all through this time. Jackie

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Annette & Richard Cosgrave said:

    We are always with you guys..sending love and healing from Ilfracombe x

    Liked by 1 person

  6. I honour you, Jeremy, as one if the bravest of people. You will tell me that your amazing equanimity in facing this dreadful disease and what if will mean for you and your lovely family, is down to your strong belief in Jesus and in the power of prayer and I will not gain say that. I cannot do that and will not as I think it is a case of whatever works. All I do know is that in your position, I doubt that I would be quite so calm. You are a lovely chap and it is my deep privilege to have known you and to have been able to call you my friend.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Grace Applebee McKenzie said:

    Thank you so much for sharing your journey Jeremy. It’s very helpful as i begin ministry in the hospice and a Beacon Centre with people such as yourself who are facing a similar prognosis – uncertain and unknown. God bless and refresh you. Love, Grace

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Sam Chapple said:

    Thanks for the encouragement Jeremy. We’re praying for you as we all cling on to the rock who is our great friend Jesus.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Bishop David Coles said:

    Jeremy, we are on holiday in Russell in the NZ Bay of Islands where the Gospel was first preached over 200 years ago on Christmas Day 1814. We went to Church at Christ Church here in Russell on Pentecost Sunday – a church built in 1835, the oldest in NZ. Reading your blog still brings hope and refreshment to this aging bishop(I am now 73), but age is not everything. I had an Aunt here in Paihia who died last year at 108! Your journey of faith in the midst of suffering really is inspirational, and even though you ponder the future, I want you to know beyond doubt that your ministry, even in sickness, continues to be a powerful instrument of Christ’s love and God’s grace. Thanks be to God! This comes with our continuing prayers and much love. Kia Kaha! +David Coles

    Liked by 1 person

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