Jeremy…husband of Catherine, father of Ben, Simeon, Tom, Joshua & Lydia. Up until the end of April 2015, he was pastor/vicar of a group of churches on the edge of Exeter in Devon, UK. In early October 2014, aged 48, he was diagnosed with advanced cancer, a stage four malignant melanoma presenting as a tumour on his lungs. The usual life expectancy is 8-12 months. Then, in late December 2014, 23 year old Ben suffered a seizure. After prolonged medical care for what was most likely to have been a viral infection affecting his brain, Ben died in April 2015. Jeremy has up until recently seemed to have responded well to pioneering immunotherapy treatments that can extend life, but from September 2016 is now facing the fresh development of brain tumours and potentially now just months to live. On January 27th 2017 Jeremy took his last breath and went to be his Lord and Saviour. The family share their thoughts, feelings and reflections as they taJeremy…husband of Catherine, father of Ben, Simeon, Tom, Joshua & Lydia. Up until the end of April 2015, he was pastor/vicar of a group of churches on the edge of Exeter in Devon, UK. In early October 2014, aged 48, he was diagnosed with advanced cancer, a stage four malignant melanoma presenting as a tumour on his lungs. The usual life expectancy is 8-12 months. Then, in late December 2014, 23 year old Ben suffered a seizure. After prolonged medical care for what was most likely to have been a viral infection affecting his brain, Ben died in April 2015. Jeremy has up until recently seemed to have responded well to pioneering immunotherapy treatments that can extend life, but from September 2016 is now facing the fresh development of brain tumours and potentially now just months to live. On January 27th 2017 Jeremy took his last breath and went to be with his Lord and Saviour. The family share their thoughts, feelings and reflections as they take this painful and unexpected journey.

Parallel journeys

long-road-into-the-sunsetThe news continues to be positive for Ben as he has made further progress in the last two days. Whilst he still has tubes at both ends, one feeding him, he’s alert. At this stage, he’s best described as being like a toddler in terms of his responses – he recognises me and Dabi, is not so sure about Catherine yet, but willingly gives her a kiss when asked, and when looking at photos, mixes up his siblings. The neurologist yesterday agreed that it seems there are blocks of memory that have returned, but others that haven’t. He waves his hand in response when we go, and smiles at times. His speech is minimal, quiet and only semi-coherent: communication is at its best when he has a ‘yes/no‘ question to answer. He’s making regular attempts to get out of bed, but is told firmly ‘no, lie down’ by us or the supervising nurse, because of the tubes. The physiotherapists had him standing yesterday to do some work with him. Apart from his mental capacities needing to improve, physically he’s very gaunt, and has lost much muscle tone.

All in all however, it’s been so encouraging for us to see his progress, although we understand that the rehabilitation road ahead is a long one. The medical team hope that as test results start to come back in the next 10 days, more answers will begin to emerge about what seems to be an auto-immune condition in Ben’s body causing a form of vasculitis.

For most of yesterday, I was literally through the wall from the neurology ward having my last treatment session with Ipilimumab. The dear NHS has now emptied an eye-watering  £360,000 worth of this state-of-the-art drug into my veins. As someone said to me recently, you must feel like the equivalent of the L’Oréal boy…“Because you’re worth it”! I’m going to CT-scanmiss Cherrybrook ward as I’ve come to enjoy my three-weekly enforced rest and relaxation session. Combined with each treatment has been an anti-histamine which makes me nicely drowsy and often sends me off to sleep. I’ve so appreciated the amazing attitude, care and attention of the nurses and other medical support staff – and that for Ben as well, especially while he was on the ICU. As far as my next steps, I’ll be having a CT scan in a month’s time. The team often find melanoma tumours by that stage to be inflamed and angry, reacting to the drug. They therefore pay little regard to this scan. However, a month on, I’m scanned again. This is the scan to which they’ll be paying particular regard as it’ll show which way it’s going.

In the meantime, when people ask how I am, I often answer as my dear old friend and mentor Simeon Damdar used to answer. Some 26 years ago, I worked as a Voluntary Evangelist for the London City Mission under Simeon’s care. But Simeon has suffered with heart problems for many years and when people asked him how he was, he’d answer, “I’m fine, I’m dandy, I’m thriving…it’s just my body that’s not so good”. I love that response. Truly one that a lover and friend of Jesus can use at most times. It is well with my soul. But I’m feeling fine and well otherwise. 

Catherine and the children are all doing “ok”, although this time with Ben has hit them all variously in different ways and at different times – one copes differently to another. Tom has managed his first term studying at Cardiff really well despite the fact that my diagnosis came only three weeks after he started. He’s even got some great first grades back. Simeon has come and gone, struggling at times but supported by his mates; Josh and Lydia I’ve mentioned in recent posts. 

As we continue to walk through each day, many messages come from friends. This one from Andrew, both a friend of ours and Ben from his time at Plymouth University, particularly struck a chord for me –   

“In the knowledge that sickness is part of this fallen world and will one day be wiped out and we pray against it…and yet knowing that suffering is that which God uses to sanctify and that even he can use sickness for good, I hope this quote from Samuel Rutherford is of some help: ‘When I am in the cellar of affliction, I look for the Lord’s choicest wines’.”

It has been a time of discovering the ‘choicest wine’…and it has been very choice. But it’s only possible because of the promises contained in these words of scripture, penned by the apostle Paul in his letter to the Romans, chapter 15

‘May the God of hope fill you with all joy and peace in believing, so that by the power of the Holy Spirit you may abound in hope’

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Comments on: "Parallel journeys" (7)

  1. Brenda Lockett said:

    Wonderful news about Ben I am so glad for you all. We are all now waiting for wonderful news on your progress dear Jeremy. Lots of prayers and good wishes winging their way to you love Brenda xx

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Very good news about Ben – still praying, especially for you Jeremy.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. The news of these profound moments of light in Ben’s recovery, suggests something miraculous. I am praying that his progress is lovingly maintained, and that you too are blessed Jeremy, May your dear family find some ease too,and the medical team a sense of well earned grace.
    With best wishes
    gail

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Good, encouraging news that Ben is showing such positive signs of recovery. We trust God for him and for a full recovery in His time. Praying too that you are also on a path of recovery. love Ivan and Jane

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Brian Willcocks said:

    Good news that Ben is progressing slowly but positively. We also hope similar improvements in your health Jeremy and with all our prayers and Gods help this will prove to be the case. Our prayers are also for Catherine and the family in that God will give them continuing strength for the times ahead. God Bless you all.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Love the quote!

    Like

  7. Lindas palavras, Deus é bom o tempo todo.

    Liked by 1 person

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