Jeremy…husband of Catherine, father of Ben, Simeon, Tom, Joshua & Lydia. Up until the end of April 2015, he was pastor/vicar of a group of churches on the edge of Exeter in Devon, UK. In early October 2014, aged 48, he was diagnosed with advanced cancer, a stage four malignant melanoma presenting as a tumour on his lungs. The usual life expectancy is 8-12 months. Then, in late December 2014, 23 year old Ben suffered a seizure. After prolonged medical care for what was most likely to have been a viral infection affecting his brain, Ben died in April 2015. Jeremy has up until recently seemed to have responded well to pioneering immunotherapy treatments that can extend life, but from September 2016 is now facing the fresh development of brain tumours and potentially now just months to live. On January 27th 2017 Jeremy took his last breath and went to be his Lord and Saviour. The family share their thoughts, feelings and reflections as they taJeremy…husband of Catherine, father of Ben, Simeon, Tom, Joshua & Lydia. Up until the end of April 2015, he was pastor/vicar of a group of churches on the edge of Exeter in Devon, UK. In early October 2014, aged 48, he was diagnosed with advanced cancer, a stage four malignant melanoma presenting as a tumour on his lungs. The usual life expectancy is 8-12 months. Then, in late December 2014, 23 year old Ben suffered a seizure. After prolonged medical care for what was most likely to have been a viral infection affecting his brain, Ben died in April 2015. Jeremy has up until recently seemed to have responded well to pioneering immunotherapy treatments that can extend life, but from September 2016 is now facing the fresh development of brain tumours and potentially now just months to live. On January 27th 2017 Jeremy took his last breath and went to be with his Lord and Saviour. The family share their thoughts, feelings and reflections as they take this painful and unexpected journey.

My First Meeting with Ipi

With all the lead-up to today, it was a bit underwhelming. After sitting in the waiting room for 3 hrs due a mis-communication over blood tests, I was eventually hooked up to the IV drip. Twenty minutes of saline, with an anti-histimine added, then the small £90,000 bag of Ipilimumab was attached. There sitting in the ward room with Catherine, we watched as couples came and went, never sure who was the ill one of the pair until the line was attached. We were encouraged when Jane, a friend of ours, also in for cancer treatment, found us and spent a hour or so with us helping pass the time. All the while, this expensive serum was being trickled into my arm over 90 minutes. It’s so new that the nurse had to go and check on how particularly it should be administered. I wondered if I should squeak like a guinea pig.

Sitting here at home now, it’s a strange feeling. I have this radical new front line drug inside me, but I feel no different. The risk period comes in the next 5-12 days as the body absorbs it and I run the risk of developing Neutropenic Sepsis, a condition described on my info card to be as serious as Meningococcal Septicaemia. It means I’ve got to watch hygiene and situations where there’s the potential of picking up infections. So, do I become a hermit, or do I just live and act normally, albeit with care? Answers on a postcard please.
Thanks today to the wonderful Roger for the transport, and the supporting conversation. It’s good, in the middle of odd times, to talk about very ordinary things. But thanks also to so, so many people who’ve visited, sent cards or emailed or phoned, baked or mowed our lawn, brought flowers and prayed. What a wonderful army of compassion you are.
My reading in the scriptures took me through the book of Zephaniah today which describes a time when in God’s wonderful future…
The Lord your God is in your midst, a mighty one who will save; he will rejoice over you with gladness; he will quiet you by his love; he will exult over you with loud singing. (‭Zephaniah‬ ‭3‬:‭17‬ ESV)
I felt a good measure of it today.

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Comments on: "My First Meeting with Ipi" (4)

  1. Elizabeth said:

    Thank you for sharing your journey. It is such an encouragement to believers and a sound testimony to those who have yet to know the rich blessings of a true and faithful God.
    When I am weak then I am strong. Grace is my shield, and Christ my song.

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  2. My thoughts and prayers are with you as you and your family start on this difficult journey. Thank you for sharing it with us all.

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  3. Steven Kenyon said:

    Dear Jeremy, Thank you so much for sharing from your heart in your blog. Sometimes I feel as though God whispers my name and wakes me up. That was the case this morning so I got up. I have been reading your blog and praying for you. Thank you for your honesty and vulnerability which will touch many people and encourage them. Your words are always an encouragement and inspiration. Lots of love to you all, Steven.

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  4. And so your journey begins. Thinking of you & your family, Lisa in Durban x

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